A Holiday Punch

PunchThis Tasty Thursday recipe is part of the recipe book collection compiled by the nutritionists of the Saint Peter’s Thyroid and Diabetes Center. Carol Schindler, Beverley Waithe, and Therese Wyman – all registered dietitians (RD) and certified diabetes educators (CDE) – recommend this low-sugar punch recipe for your holiday table. One cup contains 21 calories and these ingredients will make enough punch for six servings.

From the Saint Peter’s family to yours, a Happy Hanukkah and Merry Christmas to all.

Enjoy and don’t forget to share your healthy recipes on the Saint Peter’s University Hospital Facebook or Google + pages or via Twitter.  Mention #myTastyThursday when you post.

Ingredients 

  • 3 ½ cups sugar-free lemon-lime soda
  • ½ cups reduced calorie cranberry juice
  • 2 tbsp. lemon juice

Preparation

Combine all ingredients in punch bowl or pitcher and serve over ice.  Voila, you have a colorful punch for the holiday.

 

 

 

 

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You are Never too Old for This

When celebrity Angelina Jolie appeared on a YouTube video this past weekend to say she could not attend an upcoming movie premiere because she had what was visible, – chicken pox – it was a reminder that adults also can contract the same diseases kids usually do. Jolie’s video was released at about the same time news broke that National Hockey League players were dealing with an outbreak of the mumps.

Adults need to make sure their immunizations are up-to-date too.

Which vaccinations you need depends on your age. Some vaccinations, such as the flu vaccine, are recommended repeatedly throughout your life.  You should speak with your healthcare provider to determine which vaccines are important for you, based on your risk for various infections.  Common vaccines adults need include influenza, pneumococcal, tetanus, whooping cough, hepatitis B and A, and shingles.

ImmunizationRecommended vaccines for adults ages 19-49 include:

  • Influenza
  • Pneumococcal
  • Tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis (whooping cough)
  • Hepatitis B
  • Hepatitis A
  • Human papillomavirus (HPV)
  • Measles, mumps, rubella
  • Varicella (chicken pox)
  • Meningococcal

Recommended  vaccines for adults ages 50-64 include:

  • Influenza
  • Pneumococcal
  • Tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis (whooping cough)
  • Hepatitis B
  • Hepatitis A
  • Varicella (chicken pox)
  • Meningococcal

 Recommended vaccines for adults age 65 years and older include:

  • Influenza
  • Pneumococcal
  • Tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis (whooping cough)
  • Hepatitis B
  • Hepatitis A
  • Varicella (chicken pox)
  • Meningococcal
  • Zoster (shingles)

Vaccines are believed to be effective because they help your body build up immunity to diseases and lower your risk of getting infections that are dangerous and can be fatal.  You are never too old to be vaccinated.  Vaccines can protect you and those around you.

This blog post is published courtesy of David Alcid, MD, chief, Division of Infectious Diseases, Saint Peter’s University Hospital.  The Saint Peter’s Urgent Care Center in Skillman provides vaccinations with no appointments needed.  Visit our website to learn more about infectious disease.  To find a physician that is  part of the network of Saint Peter’s Physician Associates who have office in a community near you, visit www.SPPhysicianAssociatesTo find a physician affiliated with Saint Peter’s, visit www.saintpetershcs.com/findaphysician or call 1-855-SP-MY-DOC (1-855-776-6932).  

 

 

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